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Matthews Ridgeview Farms credits Arkansas with success of sweet potatoes

By
Keith Loria

Matthews Ridgeview Farms, a fifth-generation family-owned-and-operated company, continues to grow, increasing acreage and space for its sweet potatoes. The company is looking to grow with its current partnerships and build some new partnerships in the year ahead.

“It’s been a good and steady year, with sales up,” said Autumn Campbell, sales manager for the Wynne, AR-based company. “Although, people are getting out and doing more since the pandemic, the pandemic did keep consumers home, preparing more meals. Consumers may be more health conscious and sweet potatoes are packed with vitamins. I think that may play a role in sales being up since the pandemic.”

The company has made the most of its opportunities through the years and continues to evolve with its customers to stay competitive. With its core values of providing great quality and outstanding customer service, the company has remained a go-to sweet potato distributor for decades.

Working in Arkansas is important to Matthews Ridgeview Farms because that’s where the family roots are.

“The Matthews family has been farming in Arkansas for over 100 years, growing the business more with each generation,” Campbell said. “We are now the largest grower/shipper of sweet potatoes in Arkansas. We also farm soybeans, milo and corn.”

 Agriculture is Arkansas’ largest industry and the Matthews family has played a huge role in employing local people in the area for many years. Agriculture adds around $16 billion to the state’s economy annually and the landscape and climate in Arkansas make it a great place for a variety of agricultural products.

The biggest challenge the company faces is the rise in cost in packaging, freight and other key components that are vital to its operation.

“We increase cost where necessary while still trying to keep our partners competitive,” Campbell said. “We adjust and keep rolling.”

 Matthews Ridgeview Farms’ customers are major wholesalers, retailers and some foodservice —  and the company prides itself on customer service, consistency and integrity.

 The company is currently in the process of planting the 2022 sweet potato crop and everything has been smooth and on time so far, according to Campbell.

“Our storage crop is in good shape as well with no concerns,” she said. “We’re just going to continue doing what we can to increase business, be open to innovation and grow. We expect to do well with our growth strategy and standing by our mission statement, which is to have a reputation for integrity, quality and customer service.”

Keith Loria

Keith Loria

About Keith Loria  |  email

A graduate of the University of Miami, Keith Loria is a D.C.-based award-winning journalist who has been writing for major publications for close to 20 years on topics as diverse as real estate, food and sports. He started his career with the Associated Press and has held high editorial positions at magazines aimed at healthcare, sports and technology. When not busy writing, he can be found enjoying time with his wife, Patricia, and two daughters, Jordan and Cassidy.

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