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Edward L. Myrick produce continues to find success in Michigan

By
Keith Loria

Edward L. Myrick Produce has successful operations in Florida, Georgia and Michigan, working with chain stores and wholesalers all around the United States and Canada.

The Michigan facility in Benton Harbor has been around for several years now, and has helped the company succeed as a year-round supplier of fresh fruits and vegetables.

The company has enjoyed a strong 2024, with business booming in all areas of the company.

“For us, everything has looked good this season,” said Jimmy Myrick, vice president of Edward L. Myrick Produce. “The food service sector was good and the chain store sector was good. We’re seeing a little bit of growth in everything.”

Admittedly, the Georgia season hasn’t been as solid as Florida due to some weather issues, but business still has been good and there’s a long way to go there.

“Michigan is upcoming for us and we are on schedule and should have a good crop,” Myrick said, explaining things kick off the last week of June with squash and go until mid-October.

The season progresses from zucchini, yellow squash and cucumbers to eggplant, peppers and tomatoes, and by August, everything is in full production.

“I’m optimistic we will have a good crop and a good season,” Myrick said. “As long as weather leaves us along, we should be fine.”

Now that Edward L. Myrick Produce is a bigger player in the state, the company has realized it’s a very close knit community in the produce sector, which Myrick feels is a good thing for the industry.

When the company first came to Michigan, it took over a company that was already there, so existing relationships were already established and it was introduced to the community by the sellers, making it a very smooth transition.

“We’ve been very lucky that they’ve welcomed us as a company and we do our best to respect the farming community that’s there, and we do the best job we can possibly do,” Myrick said. “We’re a very farmers-first type of company and they like that we really look out for them.”

Strong relationships are a key to the company’s success, and that starts with communication.

“We need to listen to our farmers and listen to the problems they are having and how much things are costing them and find out solutions to maximize revenue for them so they can survive and keep farming,” Myrick said.

Prices have been a challenge, as it is elsewhere, but those working in Michigan also have to deal with the H-2A labor costs that are the highest in the country.

“Farmers are really struggling with that,” Myrick said. “Trying to find items that make sense with the amount of labor costs has been a challenge. Everyone is doing their best to make that work.”

The company plans to add some new faces to the organization in the near future as it continues to grow.

“Our footprint is expanding every year in Michigan,” Myrick said. “We’re not trying to move too fast; we’re working conservatively and working with growers around us to try and find the best deals for them and slowly try to build upon what we’ve started with.”

Photo: Ed Myrick and Jimmy Myrick of Myrick Produce.

Keith Loria

Keith Loria

About Keith Loria  |  email

A graduate of the University of Miami, Keith Loria is a D.C.-based award-winning journalist who has been writing for major publications for close to 20 years on topics as diverse as real estate, food and sports. He started his career with the Associated Press and has held high editorial positions at magazines aimed at healthcare, sports and technology. When not busy writing, he can be found enjoying time with his wife, Patricia, and two daughters, Jordan and Cassidy.

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