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Here comes the bride: A look at 2014 wedding floral trends

Are you a confetti-loving, party type of person? Or do you feel more comfortable in a rustic grand lodge? How would a revival of the Gatsby era resonate with you? Does aquaculture transport you to a place of bliss? These are the four distinct categories of flower trends that Bill Schaffer and Kristine Kratt, co-owners of Schaffer Designs in Philadephia, forecast for 2014 weddings for International Floral Distributors, a consortium owned by 18 wholesale distributors with 53 locations across the United States, according to a news release.

Schaffer and Kratt describe the wedding trends like this in the release:

“Confetti” wedding flowers are bold colors like tangerine, fuchsia, red, bright green and yellow. Gerbera daisies, poppies, dahlias, mums, pincushion proteas and gloriosa lilies reflect the playful personality of the confetti wedding.

Miranda-PIC‘Miranda’ is a fragrant, long-lasting garden rose from David Austin Roses.David Austin Roses, an English breeder of premium cut roses, recently announced the introduction of its cut rose varieties for the United States wedding market in a news release. It is launching a new website, social media channels, public relations program and marketing campaigns to present its brand and rose varieties to floral industry professionals and consumers.

“Grand Lodge” blossoms are the earthy colors of cream, stone, mossy green, chestnut and blue-grey. Flowers are simple and natural, yet luxurious, and include white and green hydrangeas, garden and spray roses, luecadendrons, dahlias, chocolate calla lilies, white clematises and white sweet peas.

“Revival” weddings combine vintage and art deco with pop culture in the soft pastels of mint, peach and blush pinks, accented with black and gold. Blooms like garden roses, calla lilies, peonies, orchids and tulips provide a romantic and glamorous wedding atmosphere.

“AquaCulture” floral colors range from turquoise to indigo to lilac, and include delphiniums, agapanthuses, hydrangeas, monkshoods and grape hyacinths combined with alliums, nigellas and succulents. These wedding flowers capture the power, beauty and movement of all things aquatic.

Ariella Chezar, owner of Ariella of New York, a flower shop, told Bridal Guide Magazine that the wedding flower of the year is the tree peony, describing it as lush, soft and exquisitely romantic.

Amber Gustafson, owner of Amber Events in Los Angeles, picked a similar bloom for Bridal Guide — the sweet-smelling garden rose.

Chezar said the flower garland is back in trend, especially down the center of a long table. Gustafson added that “touchable arrangements” of full, loose groupings of garden roses, anemones, poppies and lilacs make ideal centerpieces, along with soft vines, geranium leaves and maidenhair ferns.

Maria McBride, wedding style director of Brides Magazine, told the Society of American Florists in an interview with Floral Management magazine that she believes romantic flowers like roses, hydrangeas and lilacs are as popular as ever for weddings, especially the newer, unusual varieties. She adds that monochromatic designs are instantly unifying and dramatic, and lots of greenery adds a soothing quality.

“David Austin garden roses have a wonderful fragrance and are very long-lasting,” said Marcia Schaff, owner of Schaff Floral in Fridley, MN. “They are just so elegant in wedding work.”

Floral designers and retailers will have the ability to learn about the latest cut flowers and brides will be able to discover new rose varieties, bouquet styles, boutonniere options and floral designs for ceremonies and receptions through the company’s website and social networking outlets.

David Austin Roses is partnering with other wedding industry professionals to showcase comprehensive wedding planning ideas and resources for anyone with interest in planning weddings, according to the release.

For pictures of the firm’s roses and to learn more, go to www.davidaustinrosesusa.com.

 

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