Skip to main content

- Advertisement -

PRO*ACT Crop Update: Growers ahead of schedule

By
Tim Lynch

As summertime harvests continue along the coastal valleys of Central California (Salinas and Santa Maria Valleys), weather patterns continue to impact yields and quality across the region. The cool wet spring hindered normal planting schedules and growth cycles across the region, followed by some of the coolest spring temperatures on record. 

proactTemperatures have generally run 10-15 degrees below normal over the past few months. Weeks of below-average temperatures (with a few minor heat waves) along with warm humid overnight temperatures and heavy morning marine layer look to continue into mid-July. High pressure builds early this week with inland temperatures expected to reach the mid-90s this week.

Growers remain ahead of schedule in many fields, leading to some irregular growth within the stands, a smaller size profile and lighter carton weights and yields. Strong winds have also taken a toll on some of the tender leaf items — especially spinach — while also leaving wind and fringe burn on Romaine and leaf lettuce supplies. Supply shortages remain possible depending on the shipper and field location.

To the south, central Mexico has been dealing with multiple weather-related challenges this season. From cold drought extreme heat and rain, and in the early growing cycle, which led to weaker and more susceptible plants across multiple commodities to historically hot temperatures and hail in the past few weeks. The hot temperatures are impacting many crops in the area as well as causing a drastic rise in pest pressure that has inundated fields. 

Some acreage is a complete loss with the effects expected to last for at least the next couple of months. Production from Mexico remains very light due to inclement weather, hot temperatures, drought and labor issues. With light overall production coming from Mexico demand has shifted to California for supplies. This will keep pressure on California supplies for the near term until the eastern states begin local/regional production to provide some relief.

All these factors will keep overall supplies on the lighter side as we move through June.

With over 30 years in the produce industry, Tim Lynch started as an inspector and advanced into quality control and food safety. Beyond work, he's an avid sports fan, relishing in activities like boating, fishing, and diving. Lynch attended Cal Poly SLO before making Marina his home since 1994.

Tagged in:

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -