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Port of Oakland now up and running amid trucker protests

By
Ryan G. Beckman, senior editor

After several days of disruption by truck driver protests, the port of Oakland’s marine terminals are open and operating normally. The port of Oakland is one of the biggest gateways for California’s agricultural exporters, and last week's shutdown exacerbated the congestion of containers at the seaport.

“The port of Oakland has resumed full operations,” said Port Executive Director Director Danny Wan. "We appreciate the independent truck drivers' use of the designated Free Speech Zones and we thank local law enforcement for their continued assistance. The truckers have been heard and we now urge them to voice their grievances with lawmakers, not the port of Oakland.”

Last week’s protests prevented the timely flow of international commerce, including agricultural products, medical supplies, auto and technology parts, livestock and manufacturing parts.

The protest centers around AB5, a state labor law that reclassifies independent contractors as employees. The California Trucking Association said the law is problematic for the independent owner-operator model in trucking.

The economic impact of the port of Oakland’s maritime operations in California is estimated at $56.6 billion, including $281 million in state and local taxes. Direct employment from the port’s maritime operations is estimated at 11,000 jobs — with an additional 10,000 induced jobs and nearly 6,000 indirect jobs.

Ryan Beckman

Ryan Beckman

About Ryan Beckman  |  email

Ryan Beckman was born and raised in New Jersey. After studying creative writing at Rutgers University, he attended SUNY Binghamton and earned his master’s degree in English. The following year he and his wife, Amanda, journeyed to the province of Ontario to spend some time living in Toronto and cheering for the Maple Leafs. Ryan and Amanda now live in New York and spend their evenings staring at their ever-smiling son, Oscar.

Ryan is always looking for a good book to read, is sure to be a few hours behind on sleep and will never stop loving 8-bit games.

 

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