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The Nunes Co. looking toward the future

By
Keith Loria

Bob and Tom Nunes formed the Nunes Co. Inc., in 1976, creating the Foxy brand. Today that consists of marketing and selling fresh produce grown on more than 22,000 acres in California, Arizona, Nevada and Mexico.

“Our philosophy is to enact business practices that create positive environmental and social impact for local and global communities, our employees, business partners and future generations,” said Stephanie Cantero, communications and marketing coordinator for the Salinas, CA-based company. “We continue to market and sell both conventional and organic products at a high level in multiple growing regions to meet the needs of our customers.”

With 2022 past the halfway point, the company is looking forward to putting the current year behind them.

“It has been a difficult year for fresh vegetables due to a hyper inflationary period impacting costs in every component of our operations,” Cantero said. “Hopefully, going forward things will normalize to some degree. It is unclear if there will be an opportunity for growth in the year ahead as market prices and rising costs are not conducive for our industry to be in a growth trajectory.”

Most of the challenges that the Nunes Co. face today are out of its control. These include rising costs in fuel prices, labor costs, fertilizer and water costs.

“Some of these challenges are associated with government policies and others with supply issues on components that impact our input costs,” Cantero said. “We continue to review weekly the issues that are affecting our bottom line.”

Still, the company continues to sell and market Foxy and Foxy Organic brand fresh produce items into a challenging marketplace.

“To be successful, it takes strong ownership and management that are engaged in all operations of the business on a daily basis,” Cantero said. “In addition, you need to have a solid land base in multiple growing areas, supported by knowledgeable production personnel, harvesting and cooling companies along with a strong sales and marketing team.”

The company is projecting steady volume to market and sell in the coming season with an emphasis on improving current relationships and creating new avenues for new customers.

“We continue to see improvement within the foodservice industry and hopefully it will come back to full capacity to help increase the demand of fresh fruits and vegetables,” Cantero said. “We also anticipate business at the retail level to remain strong during these uncertain times.”

The uncertainty started during the pandemic, naturally, and the company did what it could to stay the course during the trying times.

“We continue to market and sell at the highest level during the pandemic,” Cantero said. “Our sights are focused on whether the country will fall into a recession and its impact on fresh produce. The consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables continues to decline, and we need stronger support from industry leaders to turn the tide and increase the consumption of healthy fruits and vegetables.”

Keith Loria

Keith Loria

About Keith Loria  |  email

A graduate of the University of Miami, Keith Loria is a D.C.-based award-winning journalist who has been writing for major publications for close to 20 years on topics as diverse as real estate, food and sports. He started his career with the Associated Press and has held high editorial positions at magazines aimed at healthcare, sports and technology. When not busy writing, he can be found enjoying time with his wife, Patricia, and two daughters, Jordan and Cassidy.

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