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Divine Flavor's Bon praises Jalisco grape production

By
Tad Thompson

Despite some reports and statements about Jalisco table grape production being oddly irregular regarding quality and production, Carlos Bon, sales manager of Divine Flavor, said, “That is not the case whatsoever in our operations.”

Green table grapes on the vine in March in Divine Flavor’s Jalisco vineyard.
Green table grapes on the vine in March in
Divine Flavor’s Jalisco vineyard.

As Jalisco’s new, high-tech, premium variety vineyards are so new, Bon wanted to stress that Jalisco has already proven to be an excellent early spring table grape source for Divine Flavor: “For us, the season is going smoothly. Our growing team is working very hard to assure the quality and volume we are having.” That team is led by Bon’s brother, Daniel Bon.

Because this is only the first season for Divine Flavor to ship commercial grape volumes from Jalisco, “We wanted to be conservative in our estimate” for production, he said. The firm has exceeded its estimates in volume and quality.

"This production area has proven to be an outstanding area for growing high-quality grapes," said Bon. "Divine Flavor is very proud about what we’ve accomplished this year, and we are very excited and upbeat about what’s coming up in the future!”

In 2021, “Our production timing is a couple days earlier than we expected,” he said. But timing is still excellent in relation to Divine Flavor’s import program of Chilean and Peruvian grapes.

Unlike Sonora, which is Mexico’s traditional and primary table grape production area to the north, Jalisco offers growers a semi-tropical climate, which means grape cultivation can bring harvest at a chosen time.

Divine Flavor chose to harvest green grapes at the market sweet spot of mid-April to early May, which competes only with late storage season Chilean grapes. “In our case at Divine Flavor, the reason we have Jalisco production is not necessarily to fill a gap but to have the best grapes in the market,” he said.

Furthermore, Bon said Sonoran production has now run later than normal for three straight seasons. “The fact is the earliest varieties in Sonora are not necessarily the best in quality and flavor.”  Now, Jalisco is situated to offer high-quality fruit while Sonora ramps up for its peak quality, taste and volume from mid-May until the middle part of July.

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