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Edward Myrick preparing for Georgia harvest

By
Keith Loria

Jimmy Myrick, vice president of Edward L. Myrick Produce, has liked what he’s seen so far in 2021, with more of the company opening up and business going strong.

“We are very optimistic for the spring,” he said. “We really haven’t changed much during this time. We didn’t add anything and we didn’t reduce anything; we basically kept the status quo and looked to expand our market a little bit, but that’s the normal strategy for us.”

edmyrickEdward L. Myrick Produce is starting to turn its attention to Georgia, where in the town of Leslie, the company represents Minor Brother Produce, which produces the popular Bay View brand green beans. It’s three biggest crops in the state are beans, cucumbers and squash, with about 1,100 acres devoted to this trio in total.

“We’re just getting ready to start green beans, cucumbers, squash, peppers, eggplant and hot peppers,” Myrick said. “We’ll start beans around May 15, and then start cucumbers around Memorial Day like we normally do.”

The company, based in Pompano Beach, FL, started in Georgia back in 1994.

“When we first began in Georgia, we were only doing cucumbers,” Myrick said. “Somewhere in the late ’90s, our grower purchased a new facility and expanded the operation to include green beans, squash and the others.”

Partnering with Minor all these years has been successful to both parties. Myrick said they work well together because they talk through every situation and come to answers together. It’s more than just a farmer/sales-person relationship, it’s one based on trust, communication and experience.

Georgia has become a vital component to the company.

“We’ve always been a consolidation here in Pompano, so we brought our consolidation business to Georgia because we had a much bigger facility to work with,” Myrick said. “We do quite a bit of consolidation now of all kinds of products.”

Working in Georgia enables Edward L. Myrick Produce to offer an almost year-round supply.

“When we leave Florida, we have our supply in Georgia before we move further north,” Myrick said. “It fills the gap nicely. Plus, being in the northwestern part of Georgia, we have a lot more business in the Midwest and towards Texas and Louisiana, so it expands our customer base.”

The Georgia soil is something special, and Myrick noted that it’s very different than other places, with some of it hard red clay, and a few miles later, you can be in sand, and then miles from that some black muck.

“There are a lot of different soil types in the state,” he said. “I guess that’s why you see so many items. You have rich soil for corn and cabbage, and other areas that are drier for beans and peppers.”

The planting so far is on schedule and in the absence of any big weather event between now and May 15, the company expects to have a solid crop coming out of the Georgia ground.

Looking ahead, Edward L. Myrick Produce continues to look for new opportunities, and Myrick noted there are always conversations going on.

“During the pandemic, we learned to be very flexible and look for new outlets, which helped expand our customer base and we learned perseverance through tough times,” he said. “Hard work is the secret to success. All the people in this company work really hard and do a really good job.”

 

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