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Edward L. Myrick Produce turns attention to Georgia

By
Keith Loria

Jimmy Myrick, vice president of Pompano Beach, FL-based Edward L. Myrick Produce, is happy to report that business this past year started to get back to normal as the country slowly reopened.

“We work with chain stores and wholesalers all around the United States and Canada, and we’re seeing things return to pre-pandemic levels,” he said. “Right now, we’re trying to get by from the crazy conditions of Florida, and we’re hoping that as we go to Georgia, some of this crazy weather we are seeing around the country subside and make the growing conditions a bit easier.”

Tornados and heavy rains have been in the area this spring as crops were starting to go in the ground. Myrick is optimistic that the weather will normalize and knows the Georgia farmers know what to do to have a strong crop in any sort of weather.

With the calendar turning to April, the company is starting to pay more attention to Georgia, where in the town of Leslie, the company represents Minor Brothers Produce, which offers the popular Bay View brand green beans.

“We have been selling product in Georgia since 1994 and our partnership with Minor Brothers Farms has always been an important part of our company’s year-round supply of produce,” Myrick said. “The thing about Georgia is there is so many different types of soil. There’s muckland, sand, clay and it lends itself to lots of different commodities.”

Georgia is the main focus of Myrick through July 1, with Vidalia onions first up in April and then there’s a lot of activity in May and June. The company will return to the state in the fall for some fall vegetables.

Myrick’s three biggest crops in Georgia are beans, cucumbers and squash, with nearly 1,500 acres devoted to this trio in total. Other items it deals in include eggplant, peppers, hot peppers and onions.

“The many different commodities that are available in Georgia make it a great place to do business,” Myrick said.

The partnership with Minor has been successful to both parties for almost three decades, which Myrick credits to the two working well together, talking through every situation and coming to solutions together. It’s more than just a farmer/sales-person relationship in that regard.

Rising input costs is making business more challenging for all of the farmers and the company is doing what it can to get through this rough time.

Elsewhere around the company, in 2022, Edward L. Myrick Produce will be opening a new Michigan facility that will increase its year-round supply of fresh fruits and vegetables. It’s also seeing the dividends of taking on Parrish, FL-based Voyager Farms this past October, increasing the number of growers the company represents in Florida, and giving the company an even stronger Michigan presence.

“We’re always looking at any option that becomes available to improve and increase business,” Myrick said. “It takes more planning than ever to keep costs low for your farmers and we’re looking at things further out to keep big inventories of boxes and the supplies these farmers need. That helps us stay ahead going into each season.”

Photo: Jerry Myrick, Ed Myrick and Jimmy Myrick of Myrick Produce.

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