Skip to main content

- Advertisement -

Grower Direct Marketing predicts on-time cherry season in 2024

By
Keith Loria

Grower Direct Marketing specialize in fresh cherries, blueberries, walnuts, asparagus and apples from California, Washington, Chile and Mexico.

market grower“At Grower Direct Marketing, our emphasis lies in close collaboration with growers and direct distribution to our worldwide clientele,” said Jim Hanson, managing director of the Stockton, CA-based company. “Our objective is to cater to both growers and buyers with unwavering honesty and integrity, consistently delivering top-notch products while enriching our clients’ enterprises daily.”

For more than six decades, O-G Packing Co. has earned acclaim as a pioneering force and frontrunner in the industry. Grower Direct Marketing is delighted to showcase O-G Packing’s vertically integrated approach, delivering top-quality cherries to global markets.

Hanson has been involved with Grower Direct Marketing since its inception in 1999 and before that, he was involved with the O-G cherry deal, so he’s been involved in the cherry industry for 35 years and has helped the company become a trusted name in the field.

Through partnerships in Washington state and South America, Grower Direct Marketing offers cherries to its customers nine months out of the year. This season, there are a lot of positives to the projected cherry crop.

“The timing looks to be more normal, especially when you compare it to the 2023 season, where we were 2-3 weeks late,” Hanson said. “We had a record crop, of which roughly 7 million boxes came post-Memorial Day, which is bad timing for California relative to where the Northwest crop falls. So, with us looking to start this year around April 23-24, we’ll see the bulk of our crop come off in May, and we should be cleaning up by the first week of June.”

That means the peak season will be where it should be for optimal success. Grower Direct Marketing works with pretty much all cherry varieties, with everything from the Royal variety on the early end of the season, to the Hazels, Lynns, and Tiogas to a lesser extent.

“California’s largest single variety is now the Coral, so we’re heavily into Corals now,” Hanson said. “Bing is still king, but it has its things against it; one is it doesn’t set a consistent crop year to year and its timing is another.”

The weather has been cooperative this year, and there has been adequate dormancy this year, which is important to the cherry crop.

“We had a good bloom period and the cherries were able to set, the ones we can see anyway—we have seen the early Corals and they look good,” Hanson said. “It’s not a record crop like last year, but it’s a very promotable crop. The early guesses are anywhere from 7.5 to 9.5-million for the state. Last year, we were pushing 11 million.”

Timing is the real key to pricing, he added, so hitting the peak window is important, and he expects this year’s cherry pricing to be very stable.

“Last year, wasn’t a great situation for us, or for the Northwest, it was just unfortunate timing,” Hanson said. “We don’t see that this year and pricing should be historically normal.”

Consumers are drawn to California cherries because it’s the first springtime fruit to hit the store shelves, and it offers something fresh in the produce section.“Plus, it’s a treat,” Hanson said. “Cherries are not on the shelf for 12 months, so people want them when they can get them.”

Keith Loria

Keith Loria

About Keith Loria  |  email

A graduate of the University of Miami, Keith Loria is a D.C.-based award-winning journalist who has been writing for major publications for close to 20 years on topics as diverse as real estate, food and sports. He started his career with the Associated Press and has held high editorial positions at magazines aimed at healthcare, sports and technology. When not busy writing, he can be found enjoying time with his wife, Patricia, and two daughters, Jordan and Cassidy.

Tagged in:

- Advertisement -

June 12, 2024
The spring is shaping up very well at D’Ottavio Farms, thanks to a combination of cooler weather earlier in the season and warmer weather later on. Officials at D’Ottavio, which was founded in 1903… Read More

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -