Loading…

The ultimate guide to active selling

What kind of selling is done in your shop? Yes, that’s right… what kind of selling?

This weekend while running errands, I stopped in a local restaurant for lunch and was immediately greeted, “Welcome to...”, which seemed to catch on like wildfire. I’m sure the restaurant’s intent was to immediately acknowledge their customer and make them feel welcome, but it got me thinking about the different experiences that customers receive and how a warm welcome shouldn’t end there.

activesell Does your floral shop represent active selling or passive selling? We all know that active selling generates higher sales and profits, while passive selling encourages the customer to shop at another establishment that makes them feel more important. But what are the most important points of active engagement?

Webster’s definition of active is action; moving; engaged in activity; initiating action and change; action vs. state of being; producing profit, interest or dividends.

Active selling begins with an initial greeting to each customer who enters the shop, continuous interaction with the customer as he/she browses, being available to answer questions relating to floral products, exhibiting an ability to understand a special order and create it upon demand, and the expertise to provide all services required.

Passive selling is product sitting on a shelf; no personal interaction with the customer; no one available to provide expert service to the customer and no one available to answer questions relating to the product itself.

Which type of salesmanship (active or passive) drives the most sales, generates profits, and creates a service-oriented image?

Here are the Top Five ways to create an active selling environment:

1. Speak first

Be sure to be the first one to speak, asking each customer if he/she needs any assistance. If yes, help the customer efficiently and quickly. If not, simply allow the customer to freely roam and let her/him know that you will remain available should a need arise later.

2. Stay visible

Customers are more inclined to enter and shop when they can see someone actively working in the department. Even though some of the work you do such as watering, processing, manicuring or designing may seem routine, customers find it interesting to watch. Take advantage of it to generate additional sales.

3. Customer first

Always remember that the customer comes before anything else: phone calls, unloading product, watering, socializing with a teammate, lunch hour or quitting time. There is nothing more important than your customer.

4. Quality

There is no such thing as a “reduced quality plant.” There are only good products or bad products. Poor quality products have no place in a floral shop at any price. Use this as a qualifier: “If the product is not good enough for your Mother, then it’s not good enough for someone else’s Mother, either.”

5. Finish the sale

Remember, a customer purchases a product because they want to be recognized by someone else when they present the flowers to them. Make sure that everything that is sold to a customer has your finishing touch and will leave the shop as an impressive gift. Go the extra mile and package the product properly. Close the transaction by thanking the customer for the purchase and inviting them back the next time they need another special gift.

So, there you have it. A first impression is a lasting impression. Properly greeting customers will be the difference between repeat sales and a one-time sale.

Active selling should always be on the front-line of your business plan to optimize sales and profits. When service is good… customers recognize it, and they’ll come back for more.

Melissa Jones is an experienced mass market and e-commerce buyer with over 15 years in the industry.

Ayco reports jump in bagged asparagus sales
Ayco Farms is experiencing a substantial increase in bagged asparagus sales to some of its largest retail customers as consumer trends are changing in today's economy. “Bagged asparagus grabbed attention and seems to have kept traction due to consumer trends and the convenience of packaged produce,” said Avi Nir, Ayco Read More ...
Natural Grocers announces new director
Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage Inc. announced that David C. Rooney was unanimously elected to the company's board of directors on Aug. 5. Rooney's election filled the vacant seat on the board created by the previously announced retirement of Michael T. Campbell, which was effective Aug. 5.  Rooney will serve an initial Read More ...
New cold storage and cross-docking operation Glacier Peak opens in Washington
Randy Hartmann, co-owner of Glacier Peak, a new cold storage, packing and cross-docking operation in Wapato, WA, announced its acquisition of the 55,000-square-foot cold storage warehouse Washington Harvest. Hartmann shared that "the purchase of this cold storage and packing operation is intended to provide for greater capacity and Read More ...
Keep on organic summer fruit for September success
Summer is cruising by and Stemilt’s Artisan Organics peach and nectarine season is doing the same. Now is the time to plan and push sales starting Labor Day and through the remainder of September, according to Brianna Shales, Stemilt’s senior marketing manager. Retailers should plan ads and focus on creative displays to show off Read More ...
Kroger launches contactless payments pilot in QFC division
The Kroger Co. launched a contactless payments pilot across the QFC division, located in Seattle, WA, allowing customers to use their mobile device for a more seamless checkout experience. The pilot includes the acceptance of Apple Pay, Google Pay, Samsung Pay, Fitbit Pay, mobile banking apps and contactless chip cards, Read More ...

Market Watch

the source pro-act

Western growing regions getting hit by rain, cooler temps

floral pulse